Saturday, December 10, 2016

Berkeley's Leaping Robot Can Jump Off Objects


Roboticists at UC Berkeley have designed a small robot that can leap into the air and then spring off a wall, or perform multiple vertical jumps in a row, resulting in the highest robotic vertical jumping agility ever recorded. The agility of the robot opens new pathways of locomotion that were not previously attainable. The researchers hope that one day this robot and other vertically agile robots can be used to jump around rubble in search and rescue missions.

For the full story, visit: http://news.berkeley.edu/2016/12/06/w...

To compare the vertical agility of robots and animals, the researchers developed a new metric to measure vertical agility, defined as the height that something can reach with a single jump in Earth gravity, multiplied by the frequency at which that jump can be made. Salto’s robotic vertical jumping agility is 1.75 meters per second, which is higher than the vertical jumping agility of a bullfrog (1.71 meters per second) but short of the vertical jumping agility of the galago (2.24). The robot with the second highest vertical agility that the team measured is called Minitaur (1.1 m/s).

“Developing a metric to easily measure vertical agility was key to Salto’s design because it allowed us to rank animals by their jumping agility and then identify a species for inspiration,” said Duncan Haldane, a robotics Ph.D. candidate at UC Berkeley, who led the work. Haldane is a student in the Biomimetic Millisystems Lab of Ronald Fearing, a professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences.

SALTO weighs 100 grams (3.5 ounces), is 26 centimeters (10.2 inches) tall when fully extended, and can jump up to one meter. Salto’s maximum jump height was roughly 1.008 meters (3.3 ft). For the wall jump, Salto attained an average height gain of approximately 1.21 meters (3.97 ft). Other robots can jump higher than Salto in a single leap. For example, TAUB, a locust-inspired jumping robot, can leap to 10.5 feet (3.2 meters) in a single jump.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Atlas Walking Over Rough Terrain #robotics #google


The Atlas Humanoid walking over small and partial footholds such as small stepping stones or line contacts. After each step the robot explores the new foothold by shifting its weight around its foot. To maintain balance we combine fast, dynamics stepping with the use of angular momentum (lunging of the upper body). The control algorithm was developed at IHMC, the robot was build by Boston Dynamics.


Sunday, November 6, 2016

OpenROV Trident - An Underwater Technology Drone for Everyone


The future of ocean exploration is here.


Home-Building Robot from Fastbrick Robotics



THE WORLDS FIRST GLOBALLY PATENTED AND COMMERCIALLY VIABLE 3D ROBOTIC BRICKLAYING SYSTEM 

 From the computer aided design ( CADCAM ) of a house structure, this 3D robotic end to end bricklaying system handles the automatic loading cutting, routing and placement of all the bricks course by course. The high level accuracy of the finished product allows following trades to pre-fabricate from the CAD design then simply install. The use of the automated robotic system vastly improves worksite OH&S and produces minimum waste. The machine design allows for maximum mobility and is able to work on almost any block size. Reduced construction time allows for greater flexibility and time/cost savings to builders and their customers.

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Rovables: Wearable Pet Robots #Robots #Robotics


Outfit missing that final touch? Try Rovables: pocket-sized robots that live on your clothes

Meet the Giant Robot That Builds Boeing’s Airplane Wings #Robots #Robotics


Building something as large as a 737 wing takes an even bigger machine. Boeing’s Panel Assembly Line (PAL) is the 60 ton, 20 feet tall, friendly robot that always lends a rather large hand.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Kengoro - the Robot That Sweats #Robots #Robotics


This humanoid robot developed at the University of Tokyo cools its motors by sweating.